Who Needs Long-Term Care?

Who Needs Long-Term Care?

70 percent of people turning age 65 can expect to use some form of long-term care during their lives. There are a number of factors that 

increase your chances of needing long-term care:

Age

  • The older you are, the more likely you will need long-term care.

Gender

  • Women outlive men by about five years on average and are more likely to live at home alone when they are older.

Disability*

  • Having an accident or chronic illness that causes a disability.
  • At age 40, the average length of disability is 42 months, with the possibility of long-term disability at 3 of 10.
  • At age 50, the average length of disability is 50 months, with the possibility of long-term disability at 5 of 22.
  • 69 percent of people age 90 or more have a disability.

    *Once you reach age 65, most disability policies end.

    Health Status

    • Chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.
    • Family history, such as whether your parents or grandparents had chronic conditions.
    • Poor diet and exercise habits.

    Living Arrangements

    • If you live alone, you’re more likely to need paid care than if you’re married, or single, and living with a partner.

     *Information on this site's long-term care webpages is from www.longtermcare.acl.gov.